Monday, May 4, 2015

Blase Joseph Cupich recommends more Vatican II and less tradition


Archbishop Cupich’s Column
April 19 - May 2, 2015


Catholic-Jewish relationsCultivating the good seed others have sown

Earlier last month I was privileged to present some opening remarks at the 20th anniversary of the Joseph Cardinal Bernardin Jerusalem Lectures at DePaul University. Cardinal Bernardin himself inaugurated this series and gave his “Jerusalem Lecture” in 1995 at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. The topic was anti-Semitism — a topic of no small interest then and now.
My initial appearance on this occasion gave me the chance to thank the American Jewish Committee, the Chicago Board of Rabbis, the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago, and the Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies for their support of these lectures over the past two decades.
This year’s lecturer, Rabbi David Sandmel, was quite familiar with the history of Catholic-Jewish relations, noting that the document, “Nostra Aetate,” the declaration on the relation of the church with non-Christian religions, has provided “a framework for working through the difficulties that have arisen, and that inevitably will arise.”
This watershed document from the Second Vatican Council clearly condemned anti-Semitism noting:
“True, the Jewish authorities and those who followed their lead pressed for the death of Christ; still, what happened in his passion cannot be charged against all the Jews, without distinction, then alive, nor against the Jews of today. The Jews should not be presented as rejected or accursed by God, as if this followed from the Holy Scriptures. All should see to it, then, that in catechetical work or in the preaching of the word of God they do not teach anything that does not conform to the truth of the Gospel and the spirit of Christ. Furthermore, in her rejection of every persecution against any man, the church, mindful of the patrimony she shares with the Jews and moved not by political reasons but by the Gospel’s spiritual love, decries hatred, persecutions, displays of anti-Semitism, directed against Jews at any time and by anyone.”
In my remarks I noted that we have seen a rise in anti-Semitism in Europe, the United States and elsewhere. This has sometimes been accompanied by incidents of violence and even death. These developments point to the fact that the way of thinking embraced by the church since the Second Vatican Council has not taken hold. The framework of mutual understanding needed for resolving difficulties, as Rabbi Sandmel noted, is not adopted by all.
Sadly, some people seem to be returning to, or perhaps more realistically never left, a former storyline of anti- Semitism. They find it much easier to know “who you are against rather than what you are for.” In hard times and even in good ones, blaming others and not taking responsibility is an easy thing to do.
Recent events call us to enhance our efforts at mutual understanding and make them more widely known, to develop a positive narrative that will capture the imagination of most people, and to make our positive relationships what comes first to mind for the majority of people. Our starting point must be positive — friendship, hospitality, mutual concern.
In my remarks I took the opportunity to offer some suggestions about how we might move in these positive directions.
1) We must continue our healing processes — for many people the centuries of conflict are still alive in local traditions and anecdotes. We must continue to acknowledge the truth of the past as we move into the future. This is an ongoing project.
2) We must continue to esteem the values of the Jewish tradition and its contribution to the church. As Cardinal George noted in his 2005 Bernardin Lecture which commented on “Nostra Aetate”: “As a Catholic, I must both respect the truth in Judaism and preserve and promote the spiritual and moral goods of Jewish faith and the values of Jewish culture and society. Pope Francis made a similar point in “Evangelii Gaudium”: “God continues to work among the people of the Old Covenant and to bring forth treasures of wisdom which flow from their encounter with his world. For this reason, the church also is enriched when she receives the values of Judaism.”
3) We must continue our catechesis and our positive instruction of the next generations, for many Catholics and some Jews as well have not assimilated the changes of the last 50 years and thus need to embrace our new framework for looking at things.
4) We need to continue to work toward deeper mutual understanding and toward deeper sensitivity to the needs of those on the margins — especially those living in Chicagoland.
5) Most importantly, we must continue to develop our friendship with one another. This roots our common understanding and our common efforts.
The friendship the Archdiocese of Chicago has enjoyed with the Jewish community over the years and especially through the sponsoring partners of this lecture series, has borne much fruit, which I witnessed in our gathering at DePaul.
The fruit yielded through common labors should make us proud of all those who cultivated it, but it also should give us hope that like all good fruit, it will produce seeds for future growth. All we need to do is cultivate it.

6 comments:

  1. Unlike this invalid Presbyter I know what I stand for.The one holy catholic apostolic church.

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  2. "...for MANYCatholics and SOME Jews as well have not assimilated the changes of the last 50 years"

    The eternal guilting of humanity continues. Just ask Palestinian Catholics how they feel about this statement.

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  3. This is nothing more then sugar coated ecumenical heresy designed to be church politics of inclusion with masonic Jews that deny Jesus Christ as Lord God and savior and denial of the Holy Blessed Trinity. As a traditional catholic I refuse to go along with this peace, love, kumbaya insanity.

    It is tragic that Cupich has abandoned true traditional catholicism for this novus ordo modernism. The only association we need with Jews is if they wish to convert to catholicism period!

    Francis, Cupich and the rest of the novus ordo acolytes better wake up, our relation with Judaism ended with the veil in the jewish temple was torn in two from top to bottom signifying it was done by God.

    Matthew 27:50-51 says, "And Jesus cried out again with a loud voice and yielded up his spirit. And behold, the curtain of the temple was torn in two, from top to bottom." Notice the details: 1) Jesus died, 2) the enormous 45 to 60-foot high, four inch thick curtain was torn in half, and 3) the tear was from top to bottom, clearly indicating the destruction was not man-made, but came from God.

    This connection between the death of Jesus and the torn veil is not just about God's power, but is demonstrative of who Jesus is, what the cross accomplished, and the access we have to God through Christ. Hebrews 8:1-2 notes, "Now the point in what we are saying is this: we have such a high priest, one who is seated at the right hand of the throne of the Majesty in heaven, a minister in the holy places, in the true tent that the Lord set up, not man." Jesus Himself now serves as our high priest. There is no longer a need for a Jewish high priest to stand before the Lord and make atonement for our sins. Jesus has provided for our atonement through His death on the cross.

    In addition, the tearing of the veil also helped to mark the beginning of a new covenant. Hebrews 8:13 states, "In speaking of a new covenant, he makes the first one obsolete. And what is becoming obsolete and growing old is ready to vanish away.

    We need to stop this politically correct tap dancing with Jews and other faiths! I am sick and disgusted with ecumenical heresy, The Catholic Faith is the one TRUE Church outside of which there is NO salvation!! What part of that do Francis, Cupich and the other novus ordo modernists not understand??

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    1. They understand it very, very well. They don't have the Catholic Faith. Therefore they are not Catholic. Therefore they are impudent imposters and usurpers.

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  4. Not exactly The Pugio Fidei, is it?

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  5. Cupich states @ #5: Most importantly, we must continue to develop our friendship with one another. This roots our common understanding and our common efforts.

    Gee, I didn't realize true Catholics HAVE a common understanding and/or common efforts with Judeo-Masonic world hegemony...

    But, thank goodness and hallelujah for Cupich and presbyters like him who have finally understood and correctly interpreted the Scriptures (naturally only with the legalistic, Talmudic assistance of our 'elder brothers in faith') after lo these many hundreds of years!!

    Now we know what Jesus Christ's true mission was: It was to free the Talmudic rabbis from their self imposed ghettos in backward, medieval Christendom and onto the world stage, where their demented, narcissistic, evil, pornographic, blood lust could be hailed by the princes of the world as 'freedom'.

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