Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Gaudy and (excessively) Excruciating — Francis’ new Apostolic Exhortation is released




Christ may be resurrected but Francis doesn't want you to rejoice in it. For in this Easter season he has released another Apostolic Exhortation full of his banal modernist thoughts and in the process heaped a Cross onto the backs of pewsitters that take the Novus Ordo seriously. This rumored encyclical instead turned out to be an Apostolic Exhortation but don’t worry it’s filled with a strong condemnation of Catholics neopelagians. The burdensome Gaudete et exsultate (Rejoice and be glad) was launched with its own video trailer. Watch it and see what you will learn from reading the document.




some of the excerpted lowlights
(by no means is it to be considered exhaustive)

(bold is ours for emphasis, our comments in italics)

A contemplative life is bad
26. It is not healthy to love silence while fleeing interaction with others, to want peace and quiet while avoiding activity, to seek prayer while disdaining service. Everything can be accepted and integrated into our life in this world, and become a part of our path to holiness. We are called to be contemplatives even in the midst of action, and to grow in holiness by responsibly and generously carrying out our proper mission. 
Traditionalists (aka pelagians) are bad 
58. Not infrequently, contrary to the promptings of the Spirit, the life of the Church can become a museum piece or the possession of a select few. This can occur when some groups of Christians give excessive importance to certain rules, customs or ways of acting. The Gospel then tends to be reduced and constricted, deprived of its simplicity, allure and savour. This may well be a subtle form of pelagianism, for it appears to subject the life of grace to certain human structures. It can affect groups, movements and communities, and it explains why so often they begin with an intense life in the Spirit, only to end up fossilized… or corrupt.
Francis is an oppressor because he apes the Faith 
94. Persecutions are not a reality of the past, for today too we experience them, whether by the shedding of blood, as is the case with so many contemporary martyrs, or by more subtle means, by slander and lies. Jesus calls us blessed when people “utter all kinds of evil against you falsely on my account” (Mt 5:11). At other times, persecution can take the form of gibes that try to caricature our faith and make us seem ridiculous.
Francis want charity without discrimination for one’s responsibilities
98. If I encounter a person sleeping outdoors on a cold night, I can view him or her as an annoyance, an idler, an obstacle in my path, a troubling sight, a problem for politicians to sort out, or even a piece of refuse cluttering a public space. Or I can respond with faith and charity, and see in this person a human being with a dignity identical to my own, a creature infinitely loved by the Father, an image of God, a brother or sister redeemed by Jesus Christ. That is what it is to be a Christian! Can holiness somehow be understood apart from this lively recognition of the dignity of each human being?[82]
Don’t fret over communism and stop protesting abortion so strongly
101. The other harmful ideological error is found in those who find suspect the social engagement of others, seeing it as superficial, worldly, secular, materialist, communist or populist. Or they relativize it, as if there are other more important matters, or the only thing that counts is one particular ethical issue or cause that they themselves defend. Our defence of the innocent unborn, for example, needs to be clear, firm and passionate, for at stake is the dignity of a human life, which is always sacred and demands love for each person, regardless of his or her stage of development. Equally sacred, however, are the lives of the poor, those already born, the destitute, the abandoned and the underprivileged, the vulnerable infirm and elderly exposed to covert euthanasia, the victims of human trafficking, new forms of slavery, and every form of rejection.[84] We cannot uphold an ideal of holiness that would ignore injustice in a world where some revel, spend with abandon and live only for the latest consumer goods, even as others look on from afar, living their entire lives in abject poverty.  
Welcome the invading Moslem hordes into your countries
102. We often hear it said that, with respect to relativism and the flaws of our present world, the situation of migrants, for example, is a lesser issue. Some Catholics consider it a secondary issue compared to the “grave” bioethical questions. That a politician looking for votes might say such a thing is understandable, but not a Christian, for whom the only proper attitude is to stand in the shoes of those brothers and sisters of ours who risk their lives to offer a future to their children. Can we not realize that this is exactly what Jesus demands of us, when he tells us that in welcoming the stranger we welcome him (cf. Mt 25:35)? Saint Benedict did so readily, and though it might have “complicated” the life of his monks, he ordered that all guests who knocked at the monastery door be welcomed “like Christ”,[85] with a gesture of veneration;[86] the poor and pilgrims were to be met with “the greatest care and solicitude”.[87]
103. A similar approach is found in the Old Testament: “You shall not wrong a stranger or oppress him, for you yourselves were strangers in the land of Egypt” (Ex 22:21). “When a stranger resides with you in your land, you shall not oppress him. The stranger who resides with you shall be to you as the citizen among you; and you shall love him as yourself; for you were strangers in the land of Egypt” (Lev 19:33-34). This is not a notion invented by some Pope, or a momentary fad. In today’s world too, we are called to follow the path of spiritual wisdom proposed by the prophet Isaiah to show what is pleasing to God. “Is it not to share your bread with the hungry and bring the homeless poor into your house; when you see the naked, to cover him, and not to hide yourself from your own kin? Then your light shall break forth like the dawn” (58:7-8). 
Blogs such as Call Me Jorge... are bad
115. Christians too can be caught up in networks of verbal violence through the internet and the various forums of digital communication. Even in Catholic media, limits can be overstepped, defamation and slander can become commonplace, and all ethical standards and respect for the good name of others can be abandoned. The result is a dangerous dichotomy, since things can be said there that would be unacceptable in public discourse, and people look to compensate for their own discontent by lashing out at others. It is striking that at times, in claiming to uphold the other commandments, they completely ignore the eighth, which forbids bearing false witness or lying, and ruthlessly vilify others. Here we see how the unguarded tongue, set on fire by hell, sets all things ablaze (cf. Jas 3:6).
A cloistered life isn't good
140. When we live apart from others, it is very difficult to fight against concupiscence, the snares and temptations of the devil and the selfishness of the world. Bombarded as we are by so many enticements, we can grow too isolated, lose our sense of reality and inner clarity, and easily succumb.
Discernment is the key to everything & change is good except when it’s not good.  If we block change we are blocking the Holy Spirit.
166. How can we know if something comes from the Holy Spirit or if it stems from the spirit of the world or the spirit of the devil? The only way is through discernment, which calls for something more than intelligence or common sense. It is a gift which we must implore. If we ask with confidence that the Holy Spirit grant us this gift, and then seek to develop it through prayer, reflection, reading and good counsel, then surely we will grow in this spiritual endowment.
An urgent need
167. The gift of discernment has become all the more necessary today, since contemporary life offers immense possibilities for action and distraction, and the world presents all of them as valid and good. All of us, but especially the young, are immersed in a culture of zapping. We can navigate simultaneously on two or more screens and interact at the same time with two or three virtual scenarios. Without the wisdom of discernment, we can easily become prey to every passing trend.
168. This is all the more important when some novelty presents itself in our lives. Then we have to decide whether it is new wine brought by God or an illusion created by the spirit of this world or the spirit of the devil. At other times, the opposite can happen, when the forces of evil induce us not to change, to leave things as they are, to opt for a rigid resistance to change. Yet that would be to block the working of the Spirit. We are free, with the freedom of Christ. Still, he asks us to examine what is within us – our desires, anxieties, fears and questions – and what takes place all around us – “the signs of the times” – and thus to recognize the paths that lead to complete freedom. “Test everything; hold fast to what is good” (1 Thess 5:21).
Best footnote ever
[73] Detraction and calumny are acts of terrorism: a bomb is thrown, it explodes and the attacker walks away calm and contented. This is completely different from the nobility of those who speak to others face to face, serenely and frankly, out of genuine concern for their good.

Gaudete et exsultate, Apostolic Exhortation of Francis (19 March 2018).


Who wrote this? Was it Francis’ perverted ghostwriter, ‘Smoochie’ Fernandez? It has to be because it’s as if the majority of the document is a copy-and-paste job from Fernandez’s writings and the speeches of Francis. It reads like a new age book filled with sophisms. Don’t worry, if you take ‘Gaudete et exsultate’ to heart, ‘Smoochie’ and Francis will heal you with kisses and spiritual hugs, unless you practice the Catholic Faith...so rejoice and be glad!

7 comments:

  1. The video above has been removed, though there are many other links. Out of curiosity, what was your link?

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    1. It was from Rome Reports. We relinked it with the version Vatican News - English has.

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  2. It's no surprise that Francis in practice downgrades the evil of abortion and here slips on the SEAMLESS GARMENT which identifies other issues such as immigration and econonic inequality, with the destruction of life at its most innocent and vulnerable. Our Marxist Pope's inability to free himself from economic concerns is SOOO predictable.

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  3. The man seems to be preaching the Judaism of Tikkun Olam....put on a happy face, make the world a better place etc. Catholicism is a form of idolatry and is detestable. I ask the question....is this impostor pope a Jew that somehow got smuggled into the papacy or is he a secret convert to Judaism?

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    1. He could be Noahide or a covert )ew who infiltrated the Conciliar Church while pretending to believe in the Novus Ordo false religion.

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  4. Ironic!!! 73] Detraction and calumny are acts of terrorism: a bomb is thrown, it explodes and the attacker walks away calm and contented. This is completely different from the nobility of those who speak to others face to face, serenely and frankly, out of genuine concern for their good."

    Sure, this pope is known for answering Dubia, clarifying things, and meeting the faithful face to face....not.

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  5. "They profess that they know God: but in their works they deny him; being abominable, and incredulous, and to every good work reprobate."
    [Titus 1:16]
    http://www.drbo.org/cgi-bin/s?q=deny&b=drb&t=2

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